Tuesday, March 06, 2007

So What Do You Do? 

Today I met Kath Mazzella on the outside steps of the building where I work. Kath's the founder of GAIN, the Gynaecological Awareness and Information Network. We chatted as we walked up the tree-lined street in the heat, Kath filling me in on the reluctance of many people to discuss gynaecological health - cancers especially.

Cervical cancer and the HPV virus (for which there is now a vaccine) and ovarian cancer are conditions I've read about, and which I hope to avoid with regular medical checks and healthy-ish living.

I've never considered the other types of gynaecological cancer, such as vulval cancer, which can lead to the removal of a woman's clitoris.

That's right, no one wants to talk about it! So until now there's been little support for women who do go through life-changing operations like these.

The GAIN Web site is friendly and informative - even cute, in just the right measure. Kath's passionate about raising awareness, preventing gynaecological disease and helping women, and she's willing to talk!

If you or your community group would like to know more, visit the Gynaecological Awareness and Information Network and make contact.

Comments:
Thank you so much for sharing this site!

I had hoped that the approval of the HPV vaccine would raise awareness, but much of what I have seen is confusion!

HPV causes cervical cancer, but is also responsible for many cases of vulvar, anal, and even penile cancer. In the U.S., HPV is felt to cause 25 percent of oral cancers as well, and an increasing number of young women are developing these.

Thanks again!

Lynne Eldridge M.D.
Author, "Avoiding Cancer One Day At A Time"
http://www.avoidcancernow.com
 
Hi Lynne,

Thanks for dropping by - I'm glad you found the link of interest!

Australians are very aware of the vaccine because research into the link between papilloma virus and cancer by Australian of the Year 2006 Professor Ian Frazer lead to the its development. The Sydney Morning Herald reported today 'Cervical cancer vaccine on track' - girls aged between 13 and 15 here in Australia will be vaccinated against the virus through the school vaccination program.

Thanks again for your comment - I've checked out your Web site and your book looks like an interesting read!

Cheers,

Dee
 
Dee,
Thanks for sharing that information. I am impressed with how much further along Australia is, than most of the developed world!

Lynne
 
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